Cold And Flu Tea Recipe

This article was republished with permission from SCRUBS Magazine.

In the cold winter months, nurses are especially at risk for catching viruses from patients and coworkers. While there may never be a cure for the common cold, this herbal remedy is the next best thing. This mug of hot grog will make you feel stronger while giving you a break from cold symptoms (especially a runny nose!).

Cold and Flu Tea
This recipe makes one mug.

3 slices fresh ginger (spicy, warming, immune-balancing)
5 to 10 leaves chopped sage (spicy, antihistamine)
2 to 3 sprigs fresh thyme (spicy, antibiotic, antiviral)
1 tbsp. honey (sweet, simple sugar)
Juice of half a lemon (sour, vitamin C)
Dash of cayenne pepper (hot, immune-enhancing) (optional)

Tip: Keep a jar of horseradish handy at home, in your car and at work. Horseradish will help open your sinuses! Enjoy!

Do you have a go-to warm drink for cold and flu season? Share your recipe in the comments section below.


This article was republished with permission from SCRUBS Magazine.

3 COMMENTS

  1. Peppermint tea bag, a healthy slice of lemon, 2 teaspoons of honey, a dash of cayenne pepper add 10 oz water and microwave 90-120 seconds. Every 2 hours. May add a tablespoon of bourbon to enhance a nap.

  2. I use 2 tbls Apple cider vinegar
    1 1/2 tbls honey
    juice of half lemon
    1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
    Mix with hot water

    Sip in the morning and at night.

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