Have You Ever “Moonlighted” To Supplement Your Nursing Income?

More and more nurses are “moonlighting” to supplement their nursing income. Taking on a second job has become very common in the nursing profession. Many nurses ask for additional shifts with their existing employer or at other nearby hospitals to earn more money. Others get creative and look outside the hospital setting for extra work that offers flexible hours, lower stress and requires only two to three days a week to work around their main schedule. 

But what are your options for doing this? What job opportunities and side gigs are accessible with a Nursing Degree? Believe it or not, you do have options! Check out the ideas below if you’re looking for a side hustle.

Independent Ear Piercing Specialist

Many nurses, NPs, and healthcare professionals are using Blomdahl Ear Piercing to start up their own business as an Independent Ear Piercing Specialist. The start-up kit costs $349 and includes free training. Nurses are earning $50,000 per year with just two piercings, 5 days per week. Blomdahl has a 20-year history working with healthcare professionals to provide a safe ear piercing alternative for families. After signing up, nurses receive a starter kit which includes everything needed to kick off their business. Additionally, nurses get training that includes practice materials, instructional videos and a live virtual coaching session. Flexibility is the best part! You choose your own schedule on your terms. There’s no office, no boss and 100% of profit made from the ear piercing is kept by the nurse. The work is enjoyable and can also lead to valuable connections and relationships.

Onsite Screening

There are many opportunities for nurses to work independently to provide point-of-care testing. From Flu and COVID testing to drug and alcohol testing, onsite screening provides customers with rapid turnaround of results and can help people start treatments as soon as possible or determine if an employee is drug free.

Nurse Mentor

A nurse mentor is a nurse who has more experience in a nursing field and is willing to share their knowledge and time to help nurses achieve their goals. Mentoring can be done formally or informally with virtual coaching calls and meetings.

Transitional Care

Nurses can care for patients who need assistance selecting, setting up and learning to use medical equipment at home. They can also serve as coordinators for patients with complex care needs. This is often a short-term gig, but may lead to referrals. It can be rewarding to help patients get back on their feet in a relaxed setting outside the hospital.

What jobs have you done on the side? What job do you want to try? Do you tell your primary employer about your moonlighting? Let us know in the comments section.

 

9 COMMENTS

  1. Summers between teaching semesters I traveled to stay with a friend and worked agency jobs all over south Louisiana.
    Great exposure to best practices and people were fun loving

  2. I created a healthy 6 figure income side business as an independent case manager in work comp – and now I teach others to do the same thing! Still using my clinical and critical thinking skills, but just on a different nursing path!

  3. I worked as a ER nurse starting in the late 70’s. Once we went to 12hr shifts 3 days a week, I always worked every other weekend as an agency Nurse or part time every other weekend. I also worked part time in retail but that was more about supporting my clothing habit. Now retired because of chronic Lyme-type illness but really miss working

  4. I consider myself self-employed and as such here is a list of my current gigs: home health nursing ( with three different companies), truck deiver for a CSA, landscape business, translation, music, and a private practice with street and homeless people. Then theres the usual family and household responsibilities.

    • Nice look into what nurses are doing to keep up. It appears this profession is lacking in security as is a lot of other professions. However keep looking up thanks for the insight.(Retired, but working)

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