Old School Nurse Image

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We sometimes hear a nurse referred to as “old school.” I take that to mean “in practice before the 1980s,” because that’s when I started!

I’m not here to stereotype or anything (and this list is made with love and respect), but I’ve gotta tell you, I’ve found certain things to be true about nurses who’ve been in the profession for, well, a while.

Here are a few observations that may help define the old school nurse! Is this you?

The Old School Nurse:

1.
Still wears her hair ABOVE the collar at work.

2.
Knows how to use a bath blanket and still prefers soap and water to body cleanser wipes.

3.
Owns a case of white leather shoe polish for a VERY distinctive pair of lace-up nursing shoes.

4.
Keeps a pack of mints in her pocket for post-op patients who have sore throats from the intubation.

5.
Wears ONLY two pieces of jewelry to work–a wristwatch and (if married) a plain wedding band.

6.
Keeps her school cap in a clear plastic tote on the shelf of her closet and her Nightingale Lamp in a glass display case.

7.
Makes hospital corners on her home bed sheets.

8.
Always carries an extra pen–with BLUE ink to distinguish an original form from a copy–just in case the doctor “forgets” to return the one he or she borrowed.

9.
Looks the other way if something which breaks the rules is in the best interest of the patient.

10.
Believes that nursing is a calling.

To all of the old school nurses who are still out there: Thank you and wear the cap proudly! What would you add to this list?

 


This article was republished with permission from SCRUBS Magazine, The Nurse’s Guide to Good Living.
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66 COMMENTS

  1. Though my cap is in a clear plastic tote, it is yellowed with age. Getting it meant the world to me in nursing school many, many years ago. I remember spiking glass IV bottles & using metal injectors for IMs. We used to admit patients the night before surgery for preps & chlorhexidine baths before surgery. I’m now retired but I miss my calling everyday. I will always be a Nurse; it’s who I am. I am proud of the care I gave to my patients & their families. I am grateful to have been an “old school Nurse.”

  2. Oh my God… thank you all “old nurses” for that trip down memory lane!!! I laughed,cried & said “oooh yeh I remember that. I have been a nurse over 30 yrs & still have my cap & my Florence Nightingale candle from my Capping Ceremony.
    Thank you all so much

  3. Read this article while in the Cardiac Care Unit of a major teaching hospital. 30 years as a Critical Care Nurse. Never did a patient of mine go to sleep in tears because of a life altering diagnosis , last night this fifty year old nurse went to sleep in tears for that exact reason. My nurse was in the Hall at her portable nurses station talking about her date. There is something to be said for old school.

  4. Graduate of diploma school 1974. Graduated Friday and started work the following Monday as a GN
    Worked in peds with newborns to 3 year olds. Team leading. 16 children on a team. 1 aid and an LPN
    Passed all meds, did percussion treatments,passed trays, transcribed orders, gathered all charts for rounds. No pumps for IVs. Had to closely monitor drips, rates as low as 5 cc per hour and certainly couldn’t let too much fluid infuse by mistake since patients were children. Parents didn’t always stay with children. Babies had to be fed, and older children helped with food. Didn’t wear gloves routinely unless in isolation. Window and floor air conditioning. Learned a lot about time management. Very little chance for meals or rest. Loved every minute. Have always felt I am a great nurse thanks to education and experience. But also feel nurses develop a sixth sense about their patients and need to anticipate what is going on. Still work 1 day a week in a clinic. I know nursing will always be a part of me and my identity. I think that we old school nurses think outside the box much better and are able to find alternative solutions to situations. Good luck to all the new nurses. Wish you could experience one day of the old school nurses

  5. Oh I love these comments!! And YES, Nursing is a CALLING! Anyone who is in it for “the money” will not last long!! Please, go work at WAWA!
    p.s. I still struggle over calculating !V drips by hand! It was not my forte’ in nursing school, but I am now a Neurosurgical Nurse Practitioner and I have worked in hospitals all my life. I LOVE CARING FOR MY PATIENTS!

  6. Loved this! Remember wearing dresses with hose. Starting Iv’s without gloves? Not being afraid to get dirty? Having to bounce a coin off our sheets! And enemas! Oh, and metal bedpans! Lol. Once had a tweaking trauma pt hit me with one! Oh, and recovering post op patients in the ICU at night

  7. Thank you so much for this story and the comments below. Priceless! I laughed and I cried because I’ve been there, too. I graduated in 1982. I’ve done the nurse’s cap and remember bumping it on everything tearing out a few strands of hair each time. Lol. The support hose and the nurse mates shoes, too. I started out working med/surg which was that plus overflow from every other floor in the hospital when or if they were full. There were no detox or rehab facilities back then so we got Etoh abusers, DTs, ODs ,etc. I remember leather restraints. I remember everyone coming to attention when the nurse supervisor visited the floor. All of a sudden you felt the need to go and make a round on your patients. Lol. Usually there was a little cubby with one chair for the docs to go and record on the Dictaphone so there were times we had to get up and let them sit. I admit I wasn’t crazy about it. Otherwise tho,the patient care we gave..I wouldn’t change that experience for the world. I don’t know what nursing will end up being like in the future. But I recently started working in an assisted living facility that does not use the computer for anything much and I missed not having to do paper MARs. They still use them. So, the future won’t be all bad, I think. We adapt. We’re good at it. As long as we never forget who and what comes first and that is the patient/resident. Best of luck to you all.

  8. Answert call bells. Seems today that new nurses today do not want to answer call bells especially in LTC facilities.

  9. I started as a CNA in 1971 and graduated as an RN in 1974. Currently I am a licensed nursing home administrator . But, I always tell my patients that “I am a nurse first and an administrator second”. I still answer call bells, put patients on bedpans and give meds when the staff is busy. Over the years, I have been disappointed with what I call “clip board nurses”- students who think that when they graduate, they will automatically become a manager and not have to ever get their hands dirty. I try to mentor the students by involving them in every treatment and procedure we are doing on the unit- but unfortunately, more times than I like-the students would rather sit and read the chart then to get in there are absorb the experience. Remember:
    1. Clysis
    2. Mercurochrome and Maalox for wounds (and don’t forget that heat lamp nice and close to the wound!!!!!)
    3. Rectal tubes to relieve gas after surgery
    4. Warm tea and ginger ale to relieve gas pains
    Scraping the inside of and apple skin and giving it to babies when they have diarrhea (the brown pureed stuff was pure pectin!) simple solution without drugs
    5. My first job was on a 30 bed med/surg. We would draw up the syringes with the pain meds, label with tape and line your lab coat pockets with them- NEVER gave the wrong medication-checked over and over.
    and Lastly, how were we able to give meds, do treatments, transcribe orders, document and still find time to sit and hold someone’s hand who was scared. We did, because we cared for the whole person! not just a task.

    • Yea it is amazing with all the modern technologies that med errors and needle sticks have increased dramatically…maybe that’s a result of too many distractions, i.e. Cell phones, text messaging etc…

  10. Went into Cadet Nurse Program during world war 2, @UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL AUGUSTA GA. yes JAN 2 1945. NO AIRCONDITIONER, NO GLOVES EXCEPT FOR SURGERY. THESE HAD TO BE WASHED AND DRIED AND PACKAGED AND AUTOCLAVED FOR 20 MINUTES. IRON LUNG FOR POLIO PATIENTS WHEN NEEDED, PENICILLIN WAS NEW AND GIVEN 300,00U q3H IN GLUTEAL MUSCLE. RADIUM ROD INSERTED FOR CERVICAL CANCER. ALL SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WERE WASHED DRIED WRAPPED AND AUTOCLAVED. SCISSORS WASHED AND SOAKED IN SPECIAL SOLUTION SO AS NOT TO DULL THEM. WE MADE OUR CAST MATERARAL UP OH THAT FIRST WANGANSTEIN SUCTION I AM 90 YRS OLD NOW BUT STILL DOING NURSING FOR 72 YRS. YES IT IS A CALLING. I HAVE PLENTY MORE TO TELL IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO READ IT. I LOVE NURSING. IT IS NOT WHO I AM BUT WHOSE I AM HOW ABOUT THOSE METAL BED PANS AND URINALS.

  11. Graduated in ’76; worked at VA for 32 years (bedside and administrative) and during that time also did registry on occasion. The ‘newbies’ r scary but a few of them allowed me to mentor them..what a relief! I suggested to a few of them that maybe nursing isn’t for them cuz it isn’t a JOB! It’s from the heart!! Still working FT for a small ortho hospital with plans to retire December 2018..will definitely miss Nursing however have told my friends that they will be the only nurses taking care of me if ever I am hospitalized!!!

  12. What about giving an iron injection z track or buttoning up 15 small hole buttons on your starched uniform. In nursing school I was sent to the Director of Nursing for dirty shoelaces! Major offense!! On duty we never had lunch or breaks and we did our patients respiratory treatments, range of motion, wound care, ostomy care, IV’s, transported our patients in their beds back and forth to surgery and x ray , passed and removed meal trays, kept track of our patients I and Os assisted Drs on rounds and watched for flagged charts for new orders to be transcribed and answered call lights for all patients not just the ones we were assigned. We gave a full report at the end of our shift that all the nurses attended. We knew our patients because we did it all….. and we loved the work, our patients, families and the blood sweat and tears that went with our “calling”

    • Sounds like my experiences. I graduated in 1976. I worked as a nurses aide before that. Then became a LPN and worked ortho then med surg. We did everything for our patients.One thing I love to teach young nursing students is how to “time manage”. Organize your patients, your plan, your time. Recently I heard some new RN’s talking about how they were overwhelmed. They each had 4 med surg patients. So their idea to fix this heavy workload was to transfer to ER. I spoke up. Words fell on deaf ears. Nurses need to learn the basics of nursing before being allowed into a high acuity area where the other staff assume you know. I am against new grads in high acuity.When I graduated we had to work the floor at least 2 years to be able to transfer to ICU, CCU, Burn Care or ER or OR.I have been a nurse a long time and seen a lot of changes. I get sad when I think about retiring. So I went back to school and became a Nurse Practitioner in Psychiaty. I agree with the statement above that nursing is a calling. It is. It comes from the heart and you can recieve an education in nursing school but to truly be a nurse you must “feel it”. I want to jump to the subject of burn out and the nursing shortage. I believe some girls become nurses because they are told they have to. Some think being a nurse is a cool job. Some just aren’t sure so they give it a try. Schools today do not prepare students like they did 20 years ago. I was asked to sign off on successful veinipuncture when the student never sucessfully cannulated the vein. I was told by her instructor that as long as she “tried” she should be signed off. I was shocked and did not sign. I gave her multiple attemps. She never got it. Oh my gosh I could discuss this for hours but I need to return to seeing patients. Later Old schools.

    • What memories. I did all that, too. Nursing has changed so much. I DO miss nursing as we were taught and practiced all those years. I even still keep my nursing cap in a plastic hat box. I wear it EVERY year for the entire Nurse’s Week. I have stopped by the store on my way home from work or gone out to eat and still keep it on until I get home. It is so nice to see the respect that so many still have for our profession. I have been given discounts and had people stop to talk with me and shake my hand, tell me how much we (nurses) are respected and appreciated. It is GREAT. I have taught clinical and I teach the way I was taught. I tell my students…”Nursing really is easy. The hardest part is studying and passing your exams. The easiest part is clinical. If you treat your patient like she (I teach OB, NICU and Post Partum) is your daughter, your sister, your Mother or even yourself…how would you want to be treated. It is easy. It is ALL common sense. Put yourself in your patient’s place. What would make you feel better if you were lying in that bed? I have been a nurse for 31 years and I plan to retire in the next three years. It is bitter sweet. I look forward to retiring while I am still healthy and feel great enough to enjoy retirement. At the same time, I LOVE being a nurse and have NEVER burned out on it. I love it like I did when I began 31 years ago.

  13. I am truly old school and proud . Please and thank you without having to be prompted. I loved my cap and I was proud of it. I have been an RN for 40 years. Still working full time. I love my career, I love being a nurse. I may be be computer challenged and I may slip and say Albino instead of suffers from Albinism. But I can still insert a catheter , give a bed bath, and cry when you need me too hold your hand and get you you through a tough time. I am a nurse and I never regret the day I got my pin and Solid Black Stripe in the stiff perfectly white nurses cap.

  14. Also a ’76 Grad & on the Johnson & Johnson mosaic picture of nurses. Old School nurses might not have their caps anymore, but we also don’t have tats or purple hair. We do have class as a result of our professional training, and as a result, status and we look the part. We don’t need training in “customer service” or “service recovery”, because we treated our doctors with respect and we put our patient’s needs first. More time was spent caring for the patient (even though in my early years of team nursing, we RNs were responsible for a ward, i.e. 30 patients) rather than taking care of the computer. Health care regulations were focused on supporting the helping professions instead of regulating our every move as standards were lowered. Doctors and Real Nurses were trusted to practice our profession like professionals. And yes! I DO believe being a Real Nurse is a calling. Although I love some of the new folks entering the profession; some think it is a job (they leave – they always have) and those who find a career . . . Mmmmm Maybe the calling is just a little harder to heat in today’s noise

    • worded perfectly, in yesterday’s world good care meant giving the best care you could to your patient, you and the doctor were a joint team to give the pt the best, in today’s world, it is what is on the computer system to look good to the government so the hospital will get full reimbursement for the patient’s care and expenses. What a change in focus, from competent pt care to computer documentation to “prove” you gave care to the patient, because otherwise the “government” may not believe you gave safe and competent care to the patient.

  15. Graduated in ’76 and wore a hat about one year. Also wore white oxfords and support hose for about one year before I realized they were killing me. I bought Earth shoes and white socks to wear with my white polyester pant suits, so much better. I still do hospital corners and face the pillow opening away even at home. Who remembers smoking at the nurses station and getting ashtrays for patients and for the Drs?
    The “children” I work with are awesome nurses and I am proud of them every day.

  16. So nice to hear all of the memories. Doing direct patient care since 1965(Corpman). RN in 82, ADN. I have been so proud to have been a Nurse, who happens to be male. I remember Captain Stuart Harold, USAF in 1965, an RN who I remember to this day as a motivator for me to be a Nurse. Nursing has supported me and my family, given us many advantages both personally and financially so that we may progress as a family. I will retire in 2 years at age 72, reluctantly, because I know I will miss it terribly. It will have been a wonderful ride.

  17. I graduated from a diploma school in 1971, and I still work full time in a hospital. One thing I remember is that there was nothing disposable on the trays we took in the rooms for different procedures (foley insertions, enemas, etc.). Everything was metal and glass, so it could be re-sterilized. Bad enough the few times I dropped the tray after it had been used – but I dropped one I hadn’t used yet that had the 1000cc soap suds enema solution in the pitcher! I also remember dissolving Demerol tablets in sterile water to draw up in a syringe!

  18. I’m a 1988 diploma grad and proud of it! I no longer work at the bedside, knee can’t take 12-16 hour shifts anymore, but patient care is my first love! I loved my white nurse mate shoes, polished to perfection! Hair above collar, clean clipped nails no polish!I’m sad to see nurses don’t even touch the patient on initial assessment…..sad what would they do if the machines failed

  19. I’ve been an RN since 1976, but worked as an aide while still in h igh school back in 1970. I still work full time– now as an administrator, but I’m a nurse first. still take patients to the bathroom, give injections when my nurses are busy and I still cry while holding the hand of a dying patient. Now, my staff comes to me when they see an order such as for clycis and have never heard of it yet along use it. I tell them old nurse remedies and they crack up laughing. Maybe you remember some: we used Mecurochrome and Mayonnaise to heal wounds (don’t forget the heat lamp!) what were we thinking? applying sugar to a
    prolapsed rectum or uterus to help it constrick before pushing it back in. HHH enema. High, Hot and Hell of a lot. If you worked at a catholic hospital- you could not wear pants and the dress had to be below the knees. Oh, the good old days. Looking forward to retirement next year!!!

  20. As a nurse who has often been the patient I have to admit when I have a nurse who has on scrubs she obviously tied in knots before wearing them, dirty looking gym shoes, or a scrub shirt that is pink and green cartoon characters with a scrub jacket that is Santa and Rudolph, I feel a bit unsure of her or his skill set and judgement. I know I am jumping to judge but as a patient you don’t get much face to face time with your nurse so first impressions do set the tone.

  21. Call me” old school”. I Graduated in 1970. I still work 24 hours a week in a very busy ICU. I have live on the cutting edge of Cardiology and wouldn’t trade my experience for anything. I too remember hair off the collar, no jewelry,being on time and spending more time doing a bed bath. I also remember no phone calls at work unless you were on your break. Now everyone has a cell in their pocket and some interrupt report and say oh!! I have to take this call. ???? WHAT. Yes I agree we have come a long way but there are times I think we threw the baby out with the bath water. The rigid rules we lived with in the past are part of what made us the great nurses we are today. One more thing – Doctors now refuse to let me give them my seat, and sometimes I politely tell them “My job is just as important as their job. We just function in a different
    capacity.”

    • I agree with everything you said. Today too much time battling computers and memorizing the catch phase of the Hospital corporation and using it while we smile and do the public relation gig and maybe a little nursing. But I have to say I have Never offered my chair to a doctor unless I was leaving anyway. lol

  22. I was an CNA first then graduated from LPN 1973, white hose, hair off collar, cap. Got my AAS in Nursing 1981, still in white hose, cap and hair off the collar. Both of my caps are gone but none of the memories!! Baths, back rubs, bed pans. IV’s with drip counts and tape to the new mini infusers for ambulatory patients. Have done most of it all from mopping floors to home health care and now sit behind a computer all day taking symptom calls. From strict uniform policies to now working in my PJ’s if I want. We’ve come a long way and have a long way to go still!!

  23. I was also a diploma nurse! We had excellent teachers and so much hands on nursing experience! When I started my 1st job in 1971, my head nurse told me I was her 1st pick to hire after about 4-5 other interviews. She was looking for a diploma nurse, because we already had so much clinical experience. I was promoted to assistant head nurse on the evening shift, after 3 years.
    After 9 years, I was asked to join the IV Therapy Dept. I was with them for 31 years! Back then we mixed most of the chemotherapy we gave IV push. I loved that job, (lots of times running to answer a Code Blue call). All the IV nurses had to go to the Codes, because we never knew who was free at the time of the call. I retired after 40 years, and became parttime babysitter for our 2 granddaughters! I wouldn’t change a thing! ♡♡

  24. I am a 1981 diploma graduate and I wouldn’t trade my education for the world. Back then, we learned how to be nurses and understood how and why things were done the way they were. The newer nurses I see today don’t have near the understanding of nursing the way we did, and there are so many things they don’t know. Clinicals are mostly observation or simulator lab and I would rather have an “old school” nurse care for me any day!! I was never big on caps and NEVER wore one after graduation, but I still have mine in plastic. I don’t think new nurses even have a cap. I hope the “new school” nurses grasp what an honor and a privilege it is to be a nurse.

  25. I graduated from college in 1978. I got rid of my nursing cap as soon as possible. I always wore my hair twisted up in a bun hidden under the cap. So many of those things apply to me, especially the soap and water baths. I still do that, its not a bath unless you get the patient wet and keep them covered with a bath blanket. I never got the drip rate on an IV but we used a dial-a-flow for everything. One thing I’ve noticed that designates me old school is I still aspirate the syringe when giving injections. I’ve asked new students and they tell me that this isn’t taught in nursing school anymore. As for giving up a chair for a doctor, probably not so much. They had their dictation areas and we had our charting areas. All charts were kept in big 3 ring binders. It was a huge transition from white uniforms to colorful scrubs. I love the colorful scrubs. I tell the nursing students I work with that if you don’t love it with all your heart don’t be a nurse.

  26. I got my BSN in 83, Masters in 87 and I consider myself old school because I care more about my patient than the computer which we are now supposed to nurse and not the patient. I keep my hair away from my collar, actually wear scrubs without any collar. I wear any color athletic shoes as long as they are comfortable and I can walk fast in them. I consider my docs my friends and co-workers with us and we function as a team for the patients. YES, I do cringe when I see nurses coming in to work in the morning with hair hanging down their backs and in their eyes. I want to tell them, please put all that hair in a pony tail at least, they look like they had just gotten out of bed.

  27. Old school and proud of it.
    Yes focusing on and speaking directly to the individual needs of each and every one of my patients. I allow each patient to think they are the only patient on the planet. (Even when I am swamped, which is MOST OF THE TIME!) A touch on the hand or a cool cloth across the forehead can be some of the best medicine! No need to be rushing around the room and complaining about only having a minute.

  28. New nurses don’t care about their patients the way old sch nurses did or do! Patients can really tell the difference! Really sad. What happened?

  29. Hello all ! its with great pleasure reading all these responses to being an old school nurse. I started my nursing career in 1981 and I am still going, I love being an old school nurse . My! My! i can relate to all the above like yesterday !!! In addition we had to give sitz_ bath for some skin condition,all nails must be cut short and nail polish was a no! no! , no eating or chewing gum on duty …Wow!!! its very different out here now !

  30. I agree with Sue.Most of the time spent in patient rooms are for giving meds checking IVs etc.We are so intent on documenting and entering every last bit of data that you do not realize the view for the patient is either your back or the top of the head.How can you do any observation or assessment? I am an old school nurse. You learn a lot from observation and develop an intuition as to what is happening. It is disturbing to find most doctor offices do not hire R.N.s but med techs who just are intent on getting vital signs on equipment. You can learn a lot of information by listening and taking a B/P by stethoscope and feeling a persons pulse which they are not able to do.There are some aspects of old school nursing I miss but I do not blame those who are nursing now. You
    spend a lot of time making sure everything is filled in on your computer check list because in this litigious world we are afraid.

  31. I graduated 1975. There are times I still wear my cap. As a hospice nurse now, when I wear my ‘whites’ my geriatric folk listen to me. They know what I am saying should be adhered to. So easy to give medications when everyone else is “wearing” what they were trying to give him/her.

    Permanent stains on my white uniform from an exploded banana bag.

    Patient Kardex’s written in pencil. Never mind continuity of care – when a treatment or symptom was completed it was erased because they were all written in pencil. Kardex’s used for ‘report’ one shift to the next.

    Chest tubes connected to glass bottles sitting on the floor.

    Long rubber rectal tubes remained in place for long periods to relieve gas pressure after any type of GI surgery

    Porcelain or metal bed pans

    Glass bottles with own glass for drinking water

    Hand cranked beds (unfortunately they are still around)

  32. As an “old school nurse”, by your definition, I am surprised that you do not seem to realize that there is another world outside a hospital. I graduated in1965, got my BSN in 70 and my Masters in 82. I stopped wearing a cap two weeks after my first job, when it hit a client when I bent over him. I have been out of a uniform since 1971, in the community, outpatient, research, inpatient. Gee, I thought the purpose of backrub had been to increase circulation, comfort, relaxation, and COMMUNICATION. I continue to mentor students and other nurses. There are some nurses who are ‘OLD SCHOOL’-my definition is they have not kept up with times, do not realize that the patient is the biggest part of the treatment team, and cannot adapt to change. They dictate rather than collaborate.

    • True, some “old school” & some “New-school” recent grads (in the past ten years) are resistant to change or keeping up with current standards of care/evidence based practice. There is a chair for both in the clinical education dept of the organization!

  33. Where I can get a pair of those white leather shoes these days? They were the best. Remember KY jelly to stick the nursing stripe(s) on the hat after washing, starching, and drying it? I liked the pens with all three ink colors in the barrel?

  34. Old school nurses prefer narrative charting that tells the whole story of the patient, not charting by exception which is a lawyers dream. Old school nurses know the importance of giving real bed bath with soap and water, can allow thorough assessment and develops repore with patients. Amazing how many times a skin cancer or breast or testicular cancer can be detected. Good back rub after you have warmed the lotion in hot water helped patient relax and sleep better. Gave patient your undivided attention for 5-10 minutes while doing this. So sad none of this happens anymore. RNs have become medicine pushers and computer geeks instead of patient care. So sad…

  35. Thanks for the blast from the past!! I graduated in ’81 and can relate to everything in the article and comments. I had forgotten about the different colored ink for different shifts and always took pride in my freshly polished Nurse Mates. My hair was ALWAYS off my collar and I never forgot my school pin! When I wore a dress, white pantyhose were on my legs. LOL. I wore my cap for a long time and always enjoyed seeing the variety of styles worn by different schools. Ahhh…..the good old days! ?

  36. What a walk down memory lane!! I graduated in ’81 and relate to everything mentioned! Polishing our shoes, hair off collar, different ink for different shifts, white pantyhose with dresses, the list goes on. I wore my cap for a long time and always enjoyed seeing the variety of caps from different schools. Ah nostalgia…?

    • Oh Cindy, today they have plush dictation rooms with coffee and other goodies. They do not need your chair. Now for us older nurses, they should give up their chair for us. And yes, I have said that I needed the chair please and dictate in the dictation areas so I can do my work and charting and answer the phones. No I am not rude, but we need our meager space and need room to do our work too.

  37. Having a roll of silk tape in your pocket with bandage scissors. Wearing a cotton slip under your (dress) uniform. I graduated from a three year school in 1982. I loved my cap and wore it up until the late 90’s. It was always in the clear tote bag. I do have my nightingale lamp in my curio cabinet. i always wore lace up shoes and yes, I still make hospital corners on my bed!!! I even put my pillow cases on without touching the pillow and the pillow faces away from the door!!! Taping the glass IV bottles to time them and counting drops…micro and mini!!! Those were the good ol’ days. Standing up to give the doctor your seat. Charting long hand and using three colored pens…blue for days, green for evengins, and red for nights. Miss those days

    • Well said, love it and remember it well. I am a diploma grad 1975, best nursing education, always been proud to be a diploma RN.

      • Diploma grad here from 1975. Appreciate my nursing education everyday, they have no clue. Working for 41 years, still love nursing!

  38. Always thought I was rather “old school” but the cap…seriously the cap!…mine is not anywhere to be found. It disappeared the minute it could. It was a little box thing that looked like I had had Chinese food the night before and decided the box made a lovely hat. Have you ever put a Chinese take out box on your head, secured it with pointy hair pins, and then proceeded to ram your head into every object you could see or not see, driving the pins into your brain, I think mine poked my pituitary gland at one point! If you have done that, then …..well you are weird….and you know what my head felt like for several years!

  39. I love this story and being a male in nursing since 1992 I fit about 7 of them. Another one to add to the list we prefer antique equipment to new technology and we OLD SCHOOL nurses aren’t afraid to tell put a doctor in his place.

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